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Anna Henrietta

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Anna Henrietta is duchess of Toussaint, and beloved by all her people. She became monarch after her husband Raymund died, two years before Geralt and his friends arrived in Toussaint.

Her official, protocol title is "Her Enlightened Ladyship", unofficially "Her Grace" (as in gracious, though not necessarily graceful) and in more casual matters outside the court she is to be referred to as "Lady Duchess." However, the Chamberlain and Marshal of the Court Sebastian Le Goff strongly advised Geralt to address her as "Your Grace" at all times. She is known to a select few by the shorter name, Anarietta.

Andrzej Sapkowski Edit

The duchess was in love with and loved by Dandelion, who referred to her as "his little weasel". About seven years before Geralt arrived, while Raymund was in Cintra, Dandelion made the duchess fall in love with him and they met secretly for about two months. When the people found out, word got back to Raymund about the relationship, and he threatened to tear out Dandelion's heart, roast it and force the Duchess to eat it. So Dandelion fled Toussaint. Luckily for Dandelion, Raymund later died of apoplexy. When the bard heard the news while traveling with Geralt, he returned to her.

After the bard's return, things went well for awhile, with the Duchess and Dandelion carrying on their torrid affair, but true to form, Dandelion could not keep his wandering eyes to himself. He was discovered in the arms of the Baroness Nique and sentenced to death by Anarietta. However, she had a last minute change of heart and merely banished him from the duchy forever.

Blood and Wine ExpansionEdit

Anna Henrietta appears in the Blood and Wine expansion for The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt as one of the main characters. After the events of The Beast of Toussaint, Geralt can find the duchess in the northwestern corner of the central courtyard of the Beauclair Palace and chat about the Knightly tournament and how she met Dandelion.

Associated quests Edit

Journal entry Edit

If this world has ever known a ruler who enjoyed the absolute admiration of her subjects without the need for systematic repression or a particularly cruel hangman, it was, without a doubt, the sovereign of Toussaint, Duchess Anna Henrietta. Called Anarietta by those who knew her well, she was the widow of the late lamented Duke Raymund and one-time lover of a very famous and talented artist who would prefer to remain anonymous.
A few years prior, when the witcher and a band of friends were visiting Toussaint, Anna Henrietta had had the pleasure of meeting Geralt of Rivia. When a mysterious Beast began attacking her courtiers, the duchess thus knew exactly whom to summon…
While searching for the Beast, the duchess proved that, when the need arose, she was able to throw off the chains of convention and get her hands dirty with direct action alongside the witcher. Even if she had to do so in a state of relative dishabille.
Surprisingly enough, the duchess handled the rigors of the trail as adroitly as she did those of palace audiences. Geralt quickly saw how, even when stripped of her sumptuous gown and wrapped in a coarse cloak, Anna Henrietta remained the same confident and tenacious ruler as ever. Yet then again, this should not have come as a surprise, for the Toussaint court on a daily basis hosted battles of cutting remarks, malicious half-truths and bald-faced lies that were just as fierce as any fought with sword and cannon. The duchess was an unchallenged master of this courtly warfare, and the witcher had the chance to make use of this experience.
If Geralt thought the tales of Her Illustrious Grace's implacable wrath were exaggerated, he quickly was shown how greatly he was mistaken. As soon as Anna Henrietta learned the vampire had not only escaped, but had also threatened the life of her sister, she flew into a rage that precluded all discussion. She presented matters very clearly: Geralt was to complete his contract and bring her Dettlaff's head on a silver platter.
If Syanna survived and Geralt convinced her to forgive her sister:
Luckily, the duchess' wrath burned with an intense but short-lasting heat. When Geralt managed to stop Dettlaff, Her Grace forgot all about his previous missteps and even awarded the witcher the Order of Vitis Vinifera, Toussaint's highest honor.
If Syanna survived but Geralt failed to get her to forgive her sister:
The same compassion and loyalty which earned her the love of her subjects proved Anna Henrietta's doom, leading to her murder at the hands of her own sister. Ever since that tragic day, Toussaint has celebrated an annual Week of Memory. For these seven days, the duchy enters into mourning: music stops, lights are shuttered and people hang dark curtain in their homes. They say all those who were fond of the duchess do likewise, even those who live far away, in the North...
If Syanna was killed:
Luckily, the duchess' wrath burned with an intense but short-lasting heat. When Geralt managed to stop Dettlaff, Her Grace forgot all about his previous missteps and even awarded the witcher the Order of Vitis Vinifera, Toussaint's highest honor.
It was not hard to predict how Geralt's time in Anna Henrietta's company would end. Eventually, the witcher fall into Her Grace's disfavor with a typical witcherly lack of disgrace. Who could have foreseen handing the duchess' sister over to a vampire would end badly for him? Not Geralt, it seems. Knowing Her Grace's fiery character, he was quite lucky he didn't leave the duchy a head shorter.

Gallery Edit

Notes Edit

  • There appears to be a bug with her journal entry if Syanna was killed in which it states Anna Henrietta still awarded Geralt an award.

References Edit

  1. in The Witcher game series

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